Are You Smarter Than a Vet Student?

Quinn and Nellie - Photo Credit: Susannah Kay

This week, I’m asking you to put your veterinary knowledge to the test. I hope you have fun participating and will learn something in the process. As always, my goal is to help you become a savvy medical advocate for those animals you love so dearly.

So, here’s how it works. Take a look at the following questions and choose the response you believe makes the most sense. I invite you to post your responses publicly from which I will choose two “winners” who will receive a signed copy of Speaking for Spot or Your Dog’s Best Health. I will provide the answers to all of the questions within my next blog post. Enjoy!

A. The best way to diagnose bladder stones is:

  1. An x-ray (radiograph) of the abdomen
  2. An ultrasound examination of the abdomen
  3. Palpation of the abdomen in order to feel the stones within the bladder
  4. Via surgery

B. Once a dog or cat is an adult, core vaccinations (the vaccines every dog or cat should receive) should be given:

  1. Once a year
  2. Once every two years
  3. Once every three years
  4. Never again once the adult has been vaccinated

C. Tapeworms can cause:

  1. Increased appetite
  2. Weight loss
  3. Itchiness around the anus
  4. All of the above

D. Food allergies can cause:

  1. Itchy skin
  2. Diarrhea
  3. Ear infections
  4. All of the above

E. Hip dysplasia is:

  1. Something a dog is born with
  2. Something a dog develops over time
  3. The same thing as arthritis in the hips
  4. Always a preventable disease

F. Kennel cough is:

  1. Caused by bacteria
  2. Caused by viruses
  3. Is the common name for infectious tracheobronchitis
  4. All of the above

G. A veterinary specialist is:

  1. An individual who has a special interest in a particular area of veterinary medicine
  2. An individual who has completed advanced training in a particular area of veterinary medicine
  3. An individual who has completed advanced training and has become certified in a particular area of veterinary medicine
  4. An individual with a special personality

Now, don’t forget to post your responses.

Best wishes,

Nancy Kay, DVM

Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Author of Your Dog’s Best Health: A Dozen Reasonable Things to Expect From Your Vet
Recipient, Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year Award
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Please visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot and Your Dog’s Best Health.   There you will also find “Advocacy Aids”- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet’s health. Speaking for Spot and Your Dog’s Best Health are available at www.speakingforspot.com, Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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92 Comments on “Are You Smarter Than a Vet Student?

  1. A. 1
    B. 3 We must give rabies by law in CA
    C. 4
    D. 4
    E. 1
    F. 4
    G. 3

  2. A: #2 (that’s what they did when I had a gall stone!
    B: #3, may not be correct, but as of now in CA you have to give rabies q 3 years, so I have the others done q 3 also.
    C: 4
    D: 4
    E: 1
    F: 4, all of the above
    G: 3 (and probably 4, although “special” can have different meanings!)

  3. A. Although an x-ray is an excellent way to diagnosis bladder stones, sometimes ultrasound can be helpful, and sometimes stones are actually diagnosed during surgery. In the hands of a skilled diagnostician, palpation of the abdomen could diagnose extremely large stones (which do occur).

    B. Although the American Veterinary Medical Association recommends vaccinations of adults every three years with core vaccines, other reputable sources recommend no further vaccinations after the first adult vaccination unless titers reveal insufficient immunity.

    C. Tapeworms do not drain nutrition as much as some other worms such as ascarids and hookworms, but advanced stages of tapeworms might cause poor nutrition. The most likely symptom is anal itchiness, but another common symptom is segments of the tapeworm in the stool.

    D. Food allergies usually manifest as diarrhea but food allergies often co-exist with other immune mediated illnesses and allergies, especially inhaled allergies which may cause itchiness, ear infections, and eye inflammation. Often it is fairly difficult to determine which allergy or immune mediated illness results in which symptoms.

    E. Hip dysplasia means abnormal development of the hip joint. It develops over time and usually results in degenerative joint disease (aka osteoarthritis of the joint). Although CHD does not exist at birth, it does have genetic underpinnings which do exist at birth. Prevention involves careful breeding to remove dogs who have a genetic predisposition from breeding stock. In some breeds such as borzoi, CHD is so rare that you might say that it is entirely preventable in that breed.

    F. Tracheobronchitis can be caused by either a virus or a bacteria.

    G. A veterinary specialist begins with a special interest in an area of veterinary medicine. If training is available in this are, an interested veterinarian can pursue advanced training. If a certifying body exists to issue a certification in the area, a veterinarian can become a diplomat in that area. But not all areas in which a veterinarian wants to specialize offer this whole track to pursue because veterinary medicine does not offer as many specialty areas as human medicine.

  4. OK, here goes……

    A 1
    B 1
    C 4
    D 4
    E 1
    F 4
    G 3

  5. A. 2 since some stones are radiolucent and will not show up on x-ray
    B. 3 was the compromise reached and outlined in the 2006 AAHA Vaccination Guidelines
    C. 4
    D. 4
    E. Really 1, 2, and 3 because the dog is born with instabilty in the hip joint which with time and activity causes the head of the femur to come out of the socket. That results in break down of the cartilage and then the development of osteoarthritis.
    F. 4
    G. 3

  6. A 1
    B 3
    C 4
    D4
    E 2 although there is a hereditary component, and it may appear in immature or young dogs ,may be affected, the actual dysplasia develops over time, its not pres.ent @ birth
    F 4
    G 3

  7. A) 2 – ultrasound
    B) 1 – 1x per year
    C) 4 – all of the above
    D) 4 – all of the above
    E) 1 – born with it
    F) 4 – all of hte above
    G) 3 – training & certified

  8. A. 2 – ultrasound
    B. 3 – once every 3 years
    C. 4 – all of the above
    D. 4 – all of the above
    E. 1 – something a dog is born with
    F. 3 – is the common name…
    G. 3 – an indiv who….

  9. A. – 1
    B. – 4 – Would titer
    C. – 4
    D. – 4
    E. – 1
    F. – 4
    G. – 3

  10. A – 2
    B – 3
    C – 4
    D – 4
    E – 3
    F – 3
    G – 3

  11. A. Ultrasound
    B. Once every 3 years or as needed by a titer test
    C. All of the above
    D. All of the above
    E. Something a dog is born with
    F. All of the above
    G. An individual who has completed advanced training and has become certified in a particular area of veterinary medicine

  12. a. 1
    b. 3
    c. 4
    d. 4
    e. 2 Although there is a hereditary component, the actual dysplasia begins after birth. It may be present to a degree in immature dogs, then progresses.
    f. 4
    g.. 3

  13. A) 1 – x-ray (cheaper and usually available) and 2 ultrasound (if needed)
    B) 3 – Once every three years, some localities require annual rabies. Older dogs, tier. Medical issues, no vaccines
    C) 4 – all of the above
    D) 4 – all of the above
    E) 1 – born with HD
    F) 4 – all of the above
    G) 3 – advanced training and board certified

  14. A1, B3(*), C4, D4, E1, F4, G3

    (*) or titer

  15. A. 2 (but my vet doesn’t have one in house, so we’d do a radiograph and probably get what we needed)
    B. 3
    C. 4
    D. 4
    E. 2 — but I don’t like the choices — none are entirely accurate. I consider HD a developmental disease of polygenically inherited origin.
    F. 4
    G. 3, though 4 seems to ALWAYS apply one way or the other

  16. A. 1
    B. 4, with titer test
    C. 4
    D. 4
    E. 1
    F. 4
    G. 3

  17. A:1
    B:3
    C:4
    D:4
    E:2 Kind of tricky choices to me, since it does have genetic base but it is developmental disorder, so it does develop in a way, though not over the lifetime but during the growing stage
    F:4
    G:3

  18. A. 1. is cheapest and first but may need 2.

    B. 3

    C. 4

    D. 4

    E. 1

    F. 2

    G. 3

  19. oopos forgot
    tapeworms all of the above?
    food allergies all of the above

  20. 1. bladder stone Dx
    ultrasound
    2. Core vaccines…every two years
    3. hip dysplasia ..dogs are born with it.
    4. Kennel cough, bacteria????
    5. specialist…advanced training and has become certified

  21. A. 1 (although 2 is reasonable, and sometimes they can be felt, 3)
    B. 3
    C. 4
    D. 4
    E. maybe 1, usually 2 – symptoms develop in young dogs and worsen with joint laxity/moving of the femoral head in the socket, resulting in arthritis, but I wouldn’t call it the same thing as arthritis in the hip.
    F. 4
    G. 3

  22. A. I think # 1 because bladder stones are really minerals and an x-ray should show them.
    B. This is being hotly debated any more. I do give the core vaccinations yearly but rabies not as often. I guess my current answer is #1.
    C. Tapeworms could cause all of the choices so it would be #4.
    D. I have a dog with severe food allergies. She has had # 1,2 but not #3. Maybe we have been lucky as I could see it affecting her entire system if it got bad enough.
    E. #1
    F. I always thought kennel cough was like the human bad cold. I think the answer is #4.
    G. #3. I sure rely on them when I need them. They are a blessing.

  23. A. 2 – Ultrasound
    B. 3 – Once every three years
    C. 4 – All of the above
    D. 4 – All of the above
    E. 1 – Born with it
    F. 4 – All of the above
    G. 3- Advanced training & board certified

  24. Fun quiz.

    A – 2
    B – 3, although I’d rather say 4 with titers
    C – 4
    D – 4
    E – 1, or at lease the predisposed propensity to develop it, so 2 might also be “correct”?
    F – 4
    G – 2, a board certified specialist would be 3

    ~ Joellen ~

  25. I’ll try the quiz.
    A. 1 (Not sure on this one.)
    B. 3
    C. 4
    D. 4
    E. 1
    F. 4
    G. 3
    Fun!

  26. Ok here goes, my best guesses..

    A. An x-ray (radiograph) of the abdomen
    B. Once every three years
    C. All of the above
    D. All of the above
    E. Something a dog is born with (genetic)
    F. All of the above
    G. An individual who has completed advanced training and has become certified in a particular area of veterinary medicine

  27. A. a. an xray
    B. 4. never
    C. 4. all of the above
    D. 4 all of the above
    E. 1 dog is born with it
    F. 4 all of the above
    G. 4